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Robotic Assisted Procedures

Robotic-assisted surgery, a type of minimally invasive surgery, uses surgical robotic equipment which imitates surgical movements. Minimally invasive procedures allow surgeons to operate through small ports rather than large incisions, resulting in shorter recovery times, fewer complications and reduced hospital stays. Surgical robotics combines minimally invasive surgery with highly advanced clinical technology.

Gynecologic Procedures Performed through da Vinci Surgical System®


Endometriosis is a painful, chronic disease that occurs most often in women between the ages of 25 and 40. It occurs when tissue, like that which lines the uterus, is found outside the uterus – usually in the abdomen on the ovaries, fallopian tubes, and ligaments that support the uterus.

What are the symptoms of endometriosis?

  • Pain before and during periods
  • Pain with sex
  • Infertility
  • Fatigue
  • Painful urination during periods
  • Painful bowel movements during periods
  • Other gastrointestinal upsets such as diarrhea, constipation, nausea

A leading treatment for endometriosis is robotic-assisted endometrial ablations. Advantages of robotic-assisted surgery include less bleeding, lower risk of infection, less pain and minimal scarring. Patients usually experience a faster recovery. In most cases, the patient goes home the same day and is able to get back to normal daily activity much sooner than with traditional surgery.


The surgical removal of the uterus, is the second most common surgery among women in the United States. Typically, with traditional surgery, this operation means a hospital stay of three days and up to six weeks of recovery time.

At McLaren, surgeons are getting women back to their normal routines faster using a superior robotic surgical system. With the hospital's advanced daVinci® robotics, surgeons are able to make only small incisions in the patient's abdomen.

That's because the robotics platform has tiny instruments that replicate the movements of the human wrist, allowing the surgeon to make more precise, fine movements. These special instruments -- in miniature scale -- allow for an even greater range of motion than the human hand.

The system also projects a 3-D, high-definition image of what's going on inside the body during the procedure. Surgeons say the image of the patient's anatomy is actually clearer than with the naked eye.

Robotic tools help with even the most complicated surgeries for severe endometriosis or extensive pelvic scarring from a previous surgery.

With a robotically performed hysterectomy, patients can typically return to work in about two weeks.


A procedure that allows a woman to have fibroids or tumors removed from the uterus without losing her ability to become pregnant. The advanced robotic instruments are especially suited to this type of procedure, allowing the surgeon to make only a small incision in the abdomen.


A complex procedure to correct uterine prolapse. The procedure supports the uterus by suspending the walls of the vagina from the back of the pelvis. In the past, hysterectomy was the recommended for prolapse treatment, but today, most doctors recommend that the uterus be re-suspended. The minimally invasive procedure using the da Vinci system is the gold standard for this type of surgery. To learn more about the procedure and our physicians that perform it, click here.

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Partial Knee Resurfacing Through Mako Robotic-Arm Assisted Technology

What is Mako Robotic-Arm Assisted Surgery?

Mako Robotic-Arm Assisted Surgery is a robotic arm assisted partial knee resurfacing procedure designed to relieve the pain caused by joint degeneration due to osteoarthritis (OA). By selectively targeting the part of your knee damaged by OA, your surgeon can resurface your knee while sparing the healthy bone and ligaments surrounding it.

Mako Robotic-Arm Assisted Surgery partial knee application can:

  • Enable surgeons to precisely resurface only the arthritic portion of the knee
  • Preserve healthy tissue and bone
  • Facilitate optimal implant positioning to result in a more natural feeling knee following surgery
  • Result in a more rapid recovery and shorter hospital stay than traditional total knee replacement surgery  

Unlike other more invasive procedures Mako can often be performed through a four to six inch incision over your knee with small incisions in both your femur (thigh bone) and tibia (shin). Additionally the preservation of your own natural bone and tissue along with more ideal patient specific implant positioning may also result in a more natural feeling knee. And since healthy bone is preserved, patients who undergo mako partial knee application may still be a candidate for a total knee replacement procedure later in life if necessary.

The Mako procedure is indicated for patients suffering from unicompartmental or bicompartmental knee disease. A total replacement is sometimes necessary if your surgeon discovers during surgery that your knee has more damage than originally seen in the pre-operative X-rays and CT scan.

Your physician should discuss the specific risks associated with Mako and other treatment options with you. In addition, you should be informed of any pre-operative and post-operative instructions by your surgeon or his or her staff.

Am I a Candidate for Makoplasty Partial Knee Replacement?


Mako Technology
may be the right
treatment option
for you.

If you've been diagnosed with osteoarthritis(OA) of the knee, you may be a candidate for Mako -- a robotic arm assisted partial knee resurfacing procedure designed to relieve pain and restore range of motion. Mako is an innovative treatment option for adults living with early to mid-stage osteoarthritis that has not progressed to all three compartments of the knee.

Symptoms of OA of the knee include:

  • Pain while standing or walking short distances, climbing up or downstairs, or getting in and out of chairs
  • Pain with activity
  • Start up pain or stiffness when activities are initiated from a sitting position
  • Joint stiffness after getting out of bed
  • Swelling in one or more areas of the knee
  • A grating sensation or crunching feeling in the knee during use

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Total Hip Procedure Through Mako Robotic-Arm Assisted Technology

Mako Total Hip is a procedure known as total hip replacement that is supported by robotic-arm assisted technology. This innovative solution was designed for patients who suffer from non-inflammatory or inflammatory degenerative joint disease. The robot enables surgeons to achieve a new level of precision using the latest techniques in total hip replacement and is designed to restore patient mobility and active lifestyle.

Robotic-arm assisted technology provides your surgeon a patient-specific 3-D model to pre-plan your hip replacement. During the procedure, tactile, visual, auditory feedback, and real-time data assists your surgeon in preparing the hip joint and placing the implants in the desired orientation with more accuracy.

If your surgeon determines that you are a good candidate for the Mako Robotic-Arm Assisted Surgery, he or she will schedule a computed tomography (CT) scan of your hip one or two weeks prior to your surgery date. This is used to create your unique surgical plan for optimal implant placement.

Am I a Candidate? - Mako Robotic-Arm Assisted Hip Replacement

If your symptoms aren't responding to non-surgical solutions, or your pain can no longer be controlled by medication, you may be a candidate for Mako Total Hip Arthroplasty, a procedure also known as total hip replacement. Only your surgeon can determine if Mako Total Hip Replacement is right for you.

A Mako Total Hip Replacement candidate may experience the following:

  • Pain while putting weight on the affected hip
  • Limping to lessen the weight-bearing pressure on the affected hip
  • Pain that may radiate to the groin, lower back, or down the thigh to the knee
  • Hip pain or stiffness during walking or other impact activities
  • Failure to respond to non-surgical treatments or nomsteroidal anti-inflammatory medication

Mako Total Hip may:

  • Facilitate optimal implant placement
  • Enhance stability and mobility
  • Restore an active lifestyle

Mako Robotic-Arm Assisted Surgery is typically covered by Medicare insurers-check with your private health insurers.

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Total Knee Replacement Through Mako Robotic-Arm Assisted Technology

We understand that making sure you know what to expect from your joint replacement experience is important to you. As you are reading through this material, if you have additional questions please reach out to us to discuss.

Each patient is unique, and can experience joint pain for different reasons. It’s important to talk to us about the reason for your knee pain so you can understand the treatment options available to you. Pain from arthritis and joint degeneration can be constant or come and go, occur with movement or after a period of rest, or be located in one spot or many parts of the body. It is common for patients to try medication and other conservative treatments to treat their knee pain. If you haven’t experienced adequate relief with those treatment options, you may be a candidate for Mako Total Knee Replacement, which may provide you with relief from your knee pain.

personalized pre-operative plan

How Mako Technology works

Mako Robotic-Arm Assisted Total Knee Replacement is a treatment option for adults living with mid to late-stage osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee. Mako provides you with a personalized surgical plan based on your unique anatomy. First, a CT scan of the diseased knee joint is taken. This CT scan is uploaded into the Mako System software, where a 3D model of your knee is created. This 3D model is used to pre-plan and assist your surgeon in performing your total knee replacement.

In the operating room, your surgeon follows your personalized surgical plan while preparing the bone for the Triathlon Total Knee implant. With over a decade of clinical history, Triathlon knee replacements are different than traditional knee replacements because they are designed to work with the body to promote natural-like circular motion.1-4

The surgeon guides the robotic-arm to remove diseased bone and cartilage within the pre-defined area and the Mako System helps the surgeon stay within the planned boundaries that were defined when the personalized pre-operative plan was created. In a laboratory study, Mako Technology demonstrated accurate placement of implants to a personalized surgical plan.5

It’s important to understand that the surgery is performed by an orthopaedic surgeon, who guides the robotic-arm during the surgery to position the implant in the knee joint. The robotic-arm does not perform surgery, make decisions on its own, or move without the surgeon guiding the robotic-arm. The Mako System also allows your surgeon to make adjustments to your plan during surgery as needed.

personalized pre-operative plan


Knee replacements

General indications: Total knee replacement is intended for use in individuals with joint disease resulting from degenerative, rheumatoid and post-traumatic arthritis, and for moderate deformity of the knee.

Contraindications: Knee replacement surgery is not appropriate for patients with certain types of infections, any mental or neuromuscular disorder which would create an unacceptable risk of prosthesis instability, prosthesis fixation failure or complications in postoperative care, compromised bone stock, skeletal immaturity, or severe instability of the knee.

As with any surgery, knee replacement surgery has serious risks which include, but are not limited to, peripheral neuropathies (nerve damage), circulatory compromise (including deep vein thrombosis (blood clots in the legs)), genitourinary disorders (including kidney failure), gastrointestinal disorders (including paralytic ileus (loss of intestinal digestive movement)), vascular disorders (including thrombus (blood clots), blood loss, or changes in blood pressure or heart rhythm), bronchopulmonary disorders (including emboli, stroke or pneumonia), heart attack, and death.

Implant related risks which may lead to a revision include dislocation, loosening, fracture, nerve damage, heterotopic bone formation (abnormal bone growth in tissue), wear of the implant, metal sensitivity, soft tissue imbalance, osteolysis (localized progressive bone loss), and reaction to particle debris. Knee implants may not provide the same feel or performance characteristics experienced with a normal healthy joint.

The information presented is for educational purposes only. Speak to your doctor to decide if joint replacement surgery is right for you. Individual results vary and not all patients will receive the same postoperative activity level. The lifetime of a joint replacement is not infinite and varies with each individual. Your doctor will help counsel you about how to best maintain your activities in order to potentially prolong the lifetime of the device. Such strategies include not engaging in high-impact activities, such as running, as well as maintaining a healthy weight. Ask your doctor if the Triathlon knee is right for you.

Stryker Corporation or its other divisions or other corporate affiliated entities own, use or have applied for the following trademarks or service marks: MAKO, Stryker, Triathlon. All other trademarks are trademarks of their respected owners or holders.


  1. Mistry J, Elmallah R, Chughtai M, Oktem M, Harwin S, Mont M. Long-Term Survivorship and Clinical Outcomes of a Single Radius Total Knee Arthroplasty. International XXVIII.
  2. Designed to maintain collateral ligament stability throughout the range of motion. Stryker-Initiated Dynamic Computer Simulations of Passive ROM and Oxford Rig Test, Stephen Piazza, 2003.
  3. Wang H, Simpson KJ, Ferrara MS, Chamnongkich S, Kinsey T, Mahoney, OM. Biomechanical differences exhibited during sit-to-stand between total knee arthroplasty designs of varying radii. J Arthroplasty. 2006;21(8):1193-1199.
  4. Gómez-Barrena E, Fernandez-García C, Fernandez- Bravo A, Cutillas-Ruiz R, Bermejo-Fernandez G. Functional performance with a single-radius femoral design total knee arthroplasty. Clin Ortho Relates Res. 2010;468(5):1214-1220.
  5. Hampp E. et al. Robotic-Arm Assisted Total Knee Arthroplasty Demonstrated Greater Accuracy to Plan Compared to Manual Technique. Orthopaedic Research Society 2017 Annual Meeting, San Diego, CA. Poster No. 2412. March 20-22, 2017.

Copyright © 2017 Stryker Corporation

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Urology Procedures Performed through da Vinci Surgical System®

The Disease:  Prostate Cancer

Prostate cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in the tissues of the prostate.  The prostate is a gland in the male reproductive system located just below the bladder and in front of the rectum.  It is about the size of a walnut and surrounds the urethra (the tube that empties urine from the bladder).  The prostate gland produces fluid that makes up part of the semen.

davinci prostatectomy

Approximately 16% of American men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer sometime in their life.  Treatment options and prognosis depend on the stage of the cancer, the Gleason score, and the patient's age and general health.  With greater public awareness, early detection is on the rise and mortality rates are declining.

Additionally, new advances in medical technology are enabling cancer victims to go on to live active and productive lives after their treatment.  Consult with your doctor for advice on the options that are available to treat your specific condition.

The Surgical Treatment:  Radical Prostatectomy

One of the most common treatments for prostate cancer involves the surgical removal of the prostate gland, known as radical prostatectomy.  Traditional radical prostatectomy requires a large, 8 - 10 inch incision.  This open surgery commonly results in substantial blood loss, a lengthy and uncomfortable recovery and the risk of impotence and incontinence.

Prostatectomy incisions

da Vinci Prostatectomy:  A Less Invasive Surgical Procedure

If your doctor recommends surgery to treat your prostate cancer, you may be a candidate for a new, less-invasive surgical procedure called da Vinci Prostatectomy.  This procedure incorporates a state-of-the-art surgical system that helps your surgeon see vital anatomical structures more clearly and to perform a more precise surgical procedure.

For most patients, da Vinci Prostatectomy offers numerous potential benefits over open prostatectomy including:

Surgery image
  • Shorter hospital stay
  • Less pain
  • Less risk of infection
  • Less blood loss and transfusions
  • Less scarring
  • Faster recovery
  • Quicker return to normal activities

As with any surgical procedures, these benefits cannot be guaranteed as surgery is both patient and procedure specific.

The Enabling Technology:  da Vinci Surgical System®

The da Vinci Surgical System® is powered by state-of-the-art robotic technology.  The System allows your surgeon's hand movements to be scaled, filtered and translated into precise movement of micro-instruments within the operative site.

The da Vinci System® enhances surgical capabilities by enabling the performance of complex surgeries through tiny surgical openings.  The System cannot be programmed nor can it make decisions on its own.  The da Vinci System requires that every surgical maneuver be performed with direct input from your surgeon.

The da Vinci Surgical System® has been successfully used in thousands of prostate cancer procedures worldwide.

For more information visit


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