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Greater Lansing - Alumni Spotlight

08/25/2017
photo of Pearch Dupuis, DO


Name: Pearce Dupuis, DO
Graduated from MGL FM Residency in 2015

How is life as an attending?
● Overall I would say it’s pretty good. Has it’s ups and downs, but the work is both challenging and fulfilling. Being in charge feels different, but that’s not always bad. I work in a place that has a great collaborative atmosphere just like I had in residency and so I’m never afraid to reach out for other opinions or ask for help.

Tell us about your practice!
● I am employed by a hospital owned group. We have a few different locations and multiple suites at my location where doctors in the same group work really well together. Our group as a whole share’s patients in order to offer flexibility of scheduling for acute concerns, but we maintain our own panel of patients for routine follow-ups and chronic disease management. Our group includes mid-level providers such as physicians assistance and nurse practitioners. Physician supervise the mid-level providers, but they maintain their own patient panels and work pretty independently. Our entire group is very collaborative and we try to foster in environment where it safe to ask for help or ask questions when were stumped.

What do you do for fun?
● My wife and I and our three daughters live in St. Joseph by Lake Michigan. One of our favorite family things to do is go to the beach and we try to as much as possible. In the other times I enjoy working in the yard, reading, staying as active as much as having three little ones will allow for.

What advice do you have for FM residents or medical students?
● Hang in there! It’s a long haul, you can really get you down, it can seem like it’s never going to end, but it gets better. Getting my real job after residency was a big relief for some of the financial stress of being a resident and that was helpful. Of course the “after residency” period has its challenges. I have to constantly remind myself why I am here. I have to be intentional about remembering the good patients or the good cases where a positive difference was really made so that the difficult patients or complicated healthcare system situations don’t overshadow the good. Remembering the good parts helps me take it day by day. I think it has also been really helpful to work in a place where I am friends with the other providers and staff. It’s important to find a place that is fun to work at so that when health care and challenging patients get you down, you still have that to fall back on.


photo of Kevin Valvano, DO


Name: Kevin Valvano, DO
Graduated from MGL FM Residency in 2016"

How is life as an attending?
● Life is great! It's nice to finally have consistent hours and a sense of independence. The best part is that you can begin to tailor your practice to make it specific to what you're interested in treating.

Tell us about your practice!
● I'm currently working for WellSpan Health in York, PA as part of a primary care sports medicine practice. As part of this practice, I work in the Orthopedic Urgent Care two days per week and in the Sports Medicine clinic two days per week. I manage a mixture of acute injuries (sprains/strains, fractures, concussions, etc) and chronic ailments (arthritis, gout, etc). In our office, we have x-ray and musculoskeletal ultrasound, which are both used on a daily basis. Lastly, I have not forgotten my roots and continue to utilize OMT as a part of my practice.

What do you do for fun?
● This comes as no surprise to anyone who knows me, but I continue to participate in recreational sports. We have many local venues nearby that offer adult leagues in all the major sports. Additionally, WellSpan Health sponsors other recreational events throughout the year.

What advice do you have for FM residents or medical students?
● As Confucius said, "Choose a job you love, and you will never have to work a day in your life." I know this sounds extremely cliche, but I use it to make this point: Medical students and FM residents often don't realize how many little niches there are in medicine. It really should be virtually impossible to not find a field you love. Now, it may take lots of searching and networking, but I guarantee there is something out there that will meet your passion. That's the benefit of FM; you can tailor your practice to fit whatever scope of medicine you'd like. In just my few years of residency, I saw graduates starting to build practices specializing in acupuncture, alternative medicine, geriatrics, manipulative medicine, obstetrics, pain management, sports medicine, and the list goes on. Overall, my advice is to figure out what you're passionate about and to make a career of it; no matter how small or specialized that field may seem to be.


photo of Matt Zimmerman, DO


Name: Matt Zimmerman, DO
Graduated from MGL FM Residency in 2014

How is life as an attending?
● Different from residency, but overall great. Nobody is in training, so it’s very different from residency. I have a full practice, and everything is going really well. I sometimes miss sharing cases and bouncing ideas off others. There are other providers but they are not always accessible since they work on opposite days or are busy with their own patients 50-60 feet away.

Tell us about your practice!
● Missouri Baptist Sullivan hospital is around 40 minutes from St Louis. We basically have a multispecialty clinic that includes OBGYN, Pediatrics, FM, 2 Family Medicine nurse practitioners, 2 Internal Medicine docs. Missouri Baptist Sullivan is a critical access hospital with 25 beds; we have wound care as well. The hospital is part of the Barnes Jewish Christian Hospital system.

What do you do for fun?
● FM has more time off for the most part, which is nice. Woodworking and spending time with family.

What advice do you have for FM residents or medical students?
● I’ve felt this way since residency, that the great thing about Family Medicine is that you can do all parts of medicine, if something interests you, you can do it. My advice is to keep reading because it gets really hard to do once you have your own practice. I still struggle with it now. I still think Family Medicine is the coolest thing for the flexibility it gives you.