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Vein Treatment Center

Macomb Vein Center

Venous insufficiency is caused by a series of disorders in the vein including when the valves of the veins fail to function properly, causing venous blood to collect or “pool” in the veins (venous stasis).   Venous insufficiency can often become more chronic and lead to spider veins, varicose veins, phlebitis, blood clots, skin changes and a most serious disorder, venous leg ulcer.

Take Control of Your Vein Health

If you are experiencing any of the symptoms below, it’s time to ask your physician to refer you to the experts at the McLaren Macomb Vein Center.

Varicose veins

  • Swelling in the lower legs and ankles, especially after extended periods of standing
  • Pain, aching or heaviness in the legs
  • Leathery-looking skin on the legs
  • Stasis ulcers (or venous stasis ulcers) 
  • Left untreated the seriousness of CVD, along with the complexities will worsen over time, and should be treated as soon as possible to avoid incremental discomfort and deeper venous complications.

Conditions Treated

Varicose veins

Varicose veins are dilated, thickened, elongated and twisted blood vessels that don't control blood flow as they should. In some cases, they can be small spider veins and even appear thread-like. In other cases they may appear as large grape-like clusters under the skin. Varicose veins occur more often in women than men, especially during pregnancy, and in people who have a job for which they must stand for long periods of time.

Spider Veins

Spider veins are tiny, thin veins that can be seen very close to the skin’s surface. They look like red, blue, or green spider webs just beneath the skin. Sometimes they are also described as looking like marble.

Reticular veins

Reticular veins are medium sized veins generally 2-3 mm in diameter. They are typically larger than spider veins, but smaller than varicose veins. Reticular veins are usually a blue-green or purple color and may form areas of unattractive clusters of veins predominantly located on the inner part of thighs or ankles and on the back of the legs. Sometimes, they don't protrude above the skin's surface, but they can be associated with symptoms of pain and discomfort.

Deep vein thrombosis (DVT)

Deep vein thrombosis (throm-BO-sis), or DVT, is a blood clot that forms in a vein deep in the body. Blood clots occur when blood thickens and clumps together. Most deep vein blood clots occur in the lower leg or thigh. They also can occur in other parts of the body.

Venous ulcers

A venous ulcer is a shallow wound that occurs when the leg veins don't return blood back toward the heart the way they should. This is called venous insufficiency.

Learn more

Our Specialty Treatment

We are specialists in the following procedures to treat vein conditions and diseases:

Sclerotherapy

Sclerotherapy is a common treatment for small (spider veins) and medium size (reticular) veins. A tiny needle is used to inject the veins with a solution (called a sclerosant) that irritates the lining of the vein. In response, the veins collapse and are re-absorbed. The surface veins are no longer visible. Depending on the size and location of the veins, different types and strengths of sclerosants are used. With this procedure, veins can be dealt with at an early stage, helping to prevent further complications.  Sclerotherapy is sometimes covered by insurance based on the severity of the symptoms, in other instances it is considered cosmetic.

Endovenous Laser Ablation (EVLA)

Endovenous laser ablation (EVLA), also known as Endovenous laser therapy (EVLT), is a minimally invasive procedure used to correct venous reflux disease, also called chronic venous insufficiency. Venous reflux disease is the underlying pathology that causes varicose veins, and tired, heavy, achy legs.  Performed in the office under local anesthesia the procedure involves inserting a catheter near the knee. A laser is passed through the catheter to the vein and the laser energy is used to close off the faulty blood vessel, which eventually is dissolved into the body. Insurance typically covers endovenous laser ablations for venous disease depending on the severity.

Phlebectomy

Phlebectomy is a minimally invasive procedure using a local anesthesia in which the doctor removes larger varicose veins in the legs through a series of tiny skin punctures Minimal scarring may occur. Insurance typically covers phlebectomy based on severity.

Laser Vein Treatment

Transcutaneous (through the skin) laser vein treatment is a non-invasive procedure that uses laser energy to eliminate small surface veins such the spider or reticular types.  The laser used is specifically designed to treat these small veins.  This procedure is strictly cosmetic and is not covered by insurance. 

Learn more

McLaren Macomb Vein Center Providers

Macomb Vein Center

Venous insufficiency is caused by a series of disorders in the vein including when the valves of the veins fail to function properly, causing venous blood to collect or “pool” in the veins (venous stasis).   Venous insufficiency can often become more chronic and lead to spider veins, varicose veins, phlebitis, blood clots, skin changes and a most serious disorder, venous leg ulcer.

Take Control of Your Vein Health

If you are experiencing any of the symptoms below, it’s time to ask your physician to refer you to the experts at the McLaren Macomb Vein Center.

Varicose veins

  • Swelling in the lower legs and ankles, especially after extended periods of standing
  • Pain, aching or heaviness in the legs
  • Leathery-looking skin on the legs
  • Stasis ulcers (or venous stasis ulcers) 
  • Left untreated the seriousness of CVD, along with the complexities will worsen over time, and should be treated as soon as possible to avoid incremental discomfort and deeper venous complications.

Conditions Treated

Varicose veins

Varicose veins are dilated, thickened, elongated and twisted blood vessels that don't control blood flow as they should. In some cases, they can be small spider veins and even appear thread-like. In other cases they may appear as large grape-like clusters under the skin. Varicose veins occur more often in women than men, especially during pregnancy, and in people who have a job for which they must stand for long periods of time.

Spider Veins

Spider veins are tiny, thin veins that can be seen very close to the skin’s surface. They look like red, blue, or green spider webs just beneath the skin. Sometimes they are also described as looking like marble.

Reticular veins

Reticular veins are medium sized veins generally 2-3 mm in diameter. They are typically larger than spider veins, but smaller than varicose veins. Reticular veins are usually a blue-green or purple color and may form areas of unattractive clusters of veins predominantly located on the inner part of thighs or ankles and on the back of the legs. Sometimes, they don't protrude above the skin's surface, but they can be associated with symptoms of pain and discomfort.

Deep vein thrombosis (DVT)

Deep vein thrombosis (throm-BO-sis), or DVT, is a blood clot that forms in a vein deep in the body. Blood clots occur when blood thickens and clumps together. Most deep vein blood clots occur in the lower leg or thigh. They also can occur in other parts of the body.

Venous ulcers

A venous ulcer is a shallow wound that occurs when the leg veins don't return blood back toward the heart the way they should. This is called venous insufficiency.

Learn more

Our Specialty Treatment

We are specialists in the following procedures to treat vein conditions and diseases:

Sclerotherapy

Sclerotherapy is a common treatment for small (spider veins) and medium size (reticular) veins. A tiny needle is used to inject the veins with a solution (called a sclerosant) that irritates the lining of the vein. In response, the veins collapse and are re-absorbed. The surface veins are no longer visible. Depending on the size and location of the veins, different types and strengths of sclerosants are used. With this procedure, veins can be dealt with at an early stage, helping to prevent further complications.  Sclerotherapy is sometimes covered by insurance based on the severity of the symptoms, in other instances it is considered cosmetic.

Endovenous Laser Ablation (EVLA)

Endovenous laser ablation (EVLA), also known as Endovenous laser therapy (EVLT), is a minimally invasive procedure used to correct venous reflux disease, also called chronic venous insufficiency. Venous reflux disease is the underlying pathology that causes varicose veins, and tired, heavy, achy legs.  Performed in the office under local anesthesia the procedure involves inserting a catheter near the knee. A laser is passed through the catheter to the vein and the laser energy is used to close off the faulty blood vessel, which eventually is dissolved into the body. Insurance typically covers endovenous laser ablations for venous disease depending on the severity.

Phlebectomy

Phlebectomy is a minimally invasive procedure using a local anesthesia in which the doctor removes larger varicose veins in the legs through a series of tiny skin punctures Minimal scarring may occur. Insurance typically covers phlebectomy based on severity.

Laser Vein Treatment

Transcutaneous (through the skin) laser vein treatment is a non-invasive procedure that uses laser energy to eliminate small surface veins such the spider or reticular types.  The laser used is specifically designed to treat these small veins.  This procedure is strictly cosmetic and is not covered by insurance. 

Learn more

McLaren Macomb Vein Center Providers