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Pulmonary Procedures

Pulmonary Procedures

Cardiac Stress Testing

Standard Stress Test
Cardiolite Stress Test
Pharmacological Cardiolite Stress Test
Stress Echocardiogram

Standard Stress Test

What to expect:

During this test, the patient will walk on a treadmill while staff monitors the EKG, heart rate, and blood pressure. Once the desired heart rate is achieved (based on age) the treadmill will be slowed for a cool down and recovery period. When heart rate and blood pressure return to resting values, the test is complete.

Instructions

  • Do not eat, drink, or smoke 4 hours before your test. (If diabetic and taking insulin, notify your doctor for possible dose adjustments.)
  • Wear a short-sleeve button-down shirt and comfortable walking shoes or sneakers.
  • If you are taking medication for your heart, check with your doctor. He or she may ask you to stop taking these medicines a day or two before the test.

Total Time: 1 hour

Cardiolite Stress Test

What to expect:

When the patient arrives, a nuclear medicine technician will start an IV that injects a radioactive substance. This substance allows staff to take pictures of the patient's heart. After a waiting period, the patient will lie on a table and have pictures taken.

Once the images are captured, the stress portion of the test begins. The patient will walk on a treadmill while staff monitors the EKG, heart rate, and blood pressure until a target heart rate (based on age) is achieved. A second injection will then occur and the patient will be asked to exercise for one additional minute. Once the minute is complete the treadmill will be slowed for a cool down and recovery period.

When the patient's heart rate and blood pressure return to a resting value, another waiting period will take place. After, more pictures will be taken and the test is complete.

Instructions

  • Do not eat, drink, or smoke 4 hours before your test. (If diabetic and taking insulin, notify your doctor for possible dose adjustments.)
  • Wear a short-sleeve button-down shirt and comfortable walking shoes or sneakers.
  • If you are taking medication for your heart, check with your doctor. He or she may ask you to stop taking these medicines a day or two before the test.

Total Time: 3-4 hours

Pharmacological Cardiolite Stress Test

What to expect:

When the patient arrives, a nuclear medicine technician will start an IV that injects a radioactive substance. This substance allows staff to take pictures of the patient's heart. After a waiting period, the patient will lie on a table and have pictures taken.

Once the images are captured, the stress portion of the test begins. Medication will be used to excite the heart. The patient will lie on a table while staff monitors the EKG, heart rate, and blood pressure until a target heart rate (based on age) is achieved. A second injection will then occur and the patient will go through a cool down and recovery period.

When the patient's heart rate and blood pressure return to a resting value, another waiting period will take place. After, more pictures will be taken and the test is complete.

Instructions:

  • Do not eat, drink, or smoke 4 hours before your test. (If diabetic and taking insulin, notify your doctor for possible dose adjustments.)
  • No caffeine 24 hours prior to test.
  • Wear a short-sleeve button-down shirt and comfortable walking shoes or sneakers.
  • If you are taking medication for your heart, check with your doctor. He or she may ask you to stop taking these medicines a day or two before the test.

Total Time: 3-4 hours

Stress Echocardiogram

What to expect:

During this test a cardiopulmonary technician will monitor the patient's blood pressure, heart rate, and rhythm. During the first part of the test, an ultrasound of the heart (called an echocardiogram) will be performed. Next, the patient will walk on a treadmill until the heart is beating fast. When the heart is beating quickly enough the patient will lie down, and the technician will take another ultrasound to capture images of the heart immediately following exercise. Testing is completed at this point, but the patient may be asked to stay until the physician has reviewed the study.Instructions

Instructions:

  • Do not eat, drink, or smoke 4 hours before your test. (If diabetic and taking insulin, notify your doctor for possible dose adjustments.)
  • Wear comfortable walking shoes and be prepared to remove clothing from the waist up, to be replaced with a patient gown.
  • If you are taking medication for your heart, check with your doctor. He or she may ask you to stop taking these medicines a day or two before the test.

Total Time: 1+ hour(s)

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EKG

An electrocardiogram (EKG or ECG) is a test that checks for changes in the heart while the patient exercises. Sometimes ECG abnormalities can be seen only during exercise or while symptoms are present.

During the test, specialists monitor the heart while the patient exercises on a treadmill or a stationary bicycle. Small disks, called electrodes, are applied to the patient’s chest and are connected to wires called leads. The leads are connected to a monitor that records the electrical activity of the heart. The level of exercise is gradually increased to see how the patient’s heart responds to exercise.  

An ECG is done to help find the cause of chest pain or other symptoms, and to determine treatment plans for people with heart problems. Sometimes cardiologists perform the test without exercise. This may involve medication that has the same effect on the heart as exercise.

Patients can expect:

  • Some prior preparation, including no food or fluid for a minimum of 4 hours before the test.
  • No food or drink items containing caffeine (coffee, tea, chocolate, cola) for at least 12 hours before the test.
  • The patient may be advised to stop taking certain medications before the test.

What to Bring:

  • Physician referral form
  • Current medical insurance card
  • Driver’s license or other government-issued identification
  • Wear comfortable clothing. (Avoid metal straps, buttons, zippers)

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Electroencephalogram (EEG)

The EEG is a safe and painless test that evaluates the function of your brain. If you have experienced seizures, fainting, memory loss, headaches, dizziness, stroke or head injury, your doctor may request that you have an EEG. These studies evaluate brain wave and electrical function.  Physicians refer patients for evaluation of seizures, epilepsy, attention deficit disorders, headaches, dizziness, fainting, and memory disorders. All studies are performed by trained technologists and reviewed by the Center’s neuologists.  Results are sent to the referring physician.

In preparation of the test you will be asked to sleep less than five hours the night before the test. You should also wash and dry your hair prior to your test.

During the EEG, you will sit in a  comfortable reclining chair in a quiet room. The technologist will measure your head and scrub the areas where electrodes will be placed. The electrodes will be dipped in cool cream and placed on your scalp. The lights will be dimmed and you will be allowed to lie back in the chair. The technologist will monitor the activity of your brain as you rest with your eyes closed. During the test, a strobe light will flash for about two minutes and you will be asked to open and close your eyes. You may also be asked to breathe rapidly and deeply for a few minutes. Many people fall asleep during this relaxing procedure. 

The test lasts about one hour and you will be able to resume your normal daily activities after it is completed.

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Event & Holter Monitoring

Event Monitor

What to expect:

An event monitor is a monitor that is worn for 14-30 days, depending on the doctor's order. When the patient arrives, a cardiopulmonary technician will attach and activate the monitor. The process for using the monitor will be explained and the patient should feel comfortable with the monitor and its instructions before leaving. McLaren Flint contracts with a company that will contact the patient if he or she experiences an "event" while the monitor is activated. Prior to leaving, the patient will speak with a representative from the company. An envelope will be provided to send the monitor and accompanying items back to the company at the end of the monitoring period.

Instructions

  • Keep a log of activities while wearing the monitor and relay the events and notes to the cardiopulmonary staff.
  • Follow the instructions included with the event monitor.

Total Time: 30 minutes

Holter Monitor

What to expect:

A Holter monitor is a 24 or 48-hour heart monitor that records the patient's heart activity. When the patient arrives, a cardiopulmonary technician will attach and activate the monitor. The patient must keep a diary of normal activities and any symptoms experienced. They will be instructed to return at the same time 24 to 48 hours later to have the monitor removed.

Instructions

  • Keep a log of normal activities and any symptoms experienced in the 24 to 48-hour time span
  • Continue normal daily activities. However, NO swimming, showering or bathing as the monitor cannot get wet.

Total Time: 30 minutes

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Pulmonary Function Test (PFT)

Pulmonary Function Test (PFT)

What to expect:

For this test the patient will perform several different breathing exercises. To obtain accurate measurements, the cardiopulmonary technician will provide the patient with a mouthpiece and nose clips.

Instructions

  • Do not take any breathing medications 3-4 hours before your test.
  • Follow any special instructions the doctor may give you.

Total Time: 1 hour

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Pulse Volume Recording (PVR)

Pulse Volume Recording (PVR)

What to expect:

This is a non-invasive test to check circulation. A cardiopulmonary technician will place blood pressure cuffs on the patient's arms, thighs, calves, ankles, and possibly toes. Resting measurements will be obtained and then a short walk on a treadmill will follow. Once the walk is complete, post exercise measurements will be taken.

Instructions

  • Patients will be asked to remove pants, shoes, socks, and possibly shirt for this test.

Total Time: 1 hour

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