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The information contained on this page is provided as general health information and is not intended to substitute as medical advice and direction from your physician or health care provider. Please direct any questions related to your health care provider. In an emergency, call 9-1-1 or go to the nearest emergency center.


Adenoid removal - series

Normal anatomy

The adenoids (lymphatic tissue in the back of the throat), along with the tonsils, comprise the Waldeyer ring.

Normal anatomy

Indications

Adenoidectomy may be recommended when enlarged adenoids are blocking the airway, which may be suspected if the child:

  • snores excessively
  • has trouble breathing through the nose (nasal obstruction)
  • has episodes of not breathing during sleep (sleep apnea)

Adenoidectomy may be recommended if the child has chronic ear infections that:

  • interfere with child's education
  • persist despite antibiotic treatment
  • recur 5 or more times in a year
  • recur 3 or more times a year during a two-year period

Adenoidectomy may be recommended if the child has chronic or repeated bouts of tonsillitis.

The adenoids normally shrink as the child reaches adolescence and adenoidectomy is rarely needed after reaching the teenage years.

Indications

Procedure

While the child is deep asleep and pain-free (using general anesthesia), a breathing tube is inserted into the child's mouth and throat. A small instrument is inserted into the mouth to prop it open. The adenoid tissue is removed and bleeding is controlled.

Procedure

Aftercare

Adenoidectomy is usually done as an outpatient procedure. Complete recovery takes 1 to 2 weeks. While healing, the child may have a stuffy nose, nasal drainage, and a sore throat. Soft, cool foods and drinks may help relieve throat discomfort.

Aftercare