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The information contained on this page is provided as general health information and is not intended to substitute as medical advice and direction from your physician or health care provider. Please direct any questions related to your health care provider. In an emergency, call 9-1-1 or go to the nearest emergency center.


Bunion removal - series

Normal anatomy

The foot is made up of tarsal bones, metatarsal bones and phalanges.

Normal anatomy

Indications

A bunion is a painful deformity of the bones and joint between the foot and the big toe. Long-term irritation (chronic inflammation) from arthritis, poorly-fitting shoes, or heredity causes the joint to thicken and enlarge. This causes the bones of the big toe to angle in toward and over the second toe, the foot bone (metatarsal) to angle out toward the other foot, and the skin to thicken (callus formation).

Indications

Procedure, part 1

Surgery is recommended to correct the deformity, reconstruct the bones and joint, and restore normal, pain-free function.

Procedure, part 1

Procedure, part 2

Removal of a bunion is usually done while the patient is deep asleep and pain-free (general anesthesia) and rarely requires a hospital stay. An incision is made along the bones of the big toe into the foot. The deformed joint and bones are repaired and the bones are stabilized with a pin or cast.

Procedure, part 2

Aftercare

The patient is advised to keep the foot propped up and protected from pressure, weight, and injury while it heals. Complete recovery may require 3 to 5 weeks.

Aftercare