FAQs

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  • What do the insurance terms mean? - Glossary of Insurance Terms

    Coinsurance: The percentage of costs of a covered health care service you pay after you have paid your deductible.

    Copayment: A fixed amount you pay for a covered health care service after you have paid your deductible.

    Cost Sharing: The share of costs covered by your insurance that you pay out of your own pocket. This term generally includes deductibles, coinsurance, and copayments, or similar charges, but it does not include premiums, balance billing amounts for non-network providers, or the cost(s) of non-covered services. Cost sharing in Medicaid and CHIP also includes premiums.

    Fee for Service: A method in which doctors and other health care providers are paid for each service performed. Examples of services include tests and office visits.

    Health Insurance: A contract that requires your health insurer to pay some or all of your health care costs in exchange for a premium.

    Inpatient Care: Health care that you get when you’re admitted as an inpatient to a health care facility, like a hospital or skilled nursing facility.

    Medicaid: Insurance program that provides free or low-cost health coverage to some low-income people, families and children, pregnant women, the elderly, and people with disabilities. You can apply anytime. If you qualify, your coverage can begin immediately.

    Medically Necessary: Health care services or supplies needed to diagnose or treat an illness, injury, condition, disease or its symptoms and that meet accepted standards of medicine.

    Medicare: A federal health insurance program for people 65 and older and certain younger people with disabilities. It also covers people with End-Stage Renal Disease (permanent kidney failure requiring dialysis or a transplant, sometimes called ESRD).

    Network: The facilities, providers, and suppliers your health insurer or plan has contracted with to provide services.

    Primary Care: Health services that cover a range of prevention, wellness, and treatment for common illnesses. Primary care providers include doctors, nurses, nurse practitioners, and physician assistants. They often maintain long-term relationships with you and advise and treat you on a range of health related issues. They may also coordinate your care with specialists.

    Plan: A benefit your employer, union or other group sponsor provides to you to pay for your health care services.

    Premium: The amount you pay for your health insurance every month. In addition to your premium, you usually have to pay other costs for your health care, including a deductible, copayments, and coinsurance.

    Uncompensated Care: Health care or services provided by hospitals or health care providers that are not reimbursed.

  • A - What is proton therapy?

    Proton therapy is the most technologically advanced method to deliver radiation treatments to cancerous tumors available today. A large machine called a synchrotron extracts protons from hydrogen atoms, accelerating them to almost the speed of light, and delivering the radiation with pinpoint accuracy. The unique characteristics of how protons interact within the human body allow it to deliver curative radiation doses while reducing doses to healthy tissues and organs, resulting in fewer complications and side effects than standard radiation therapy.

  • J - Are there side effects? Are they the same side effects as conventional radiation?

    The side effects vary by the type of cancer. Proton therapy may have fewer side effects than traditional X-ray radiation, which allows patients to maintain their current quality of life during and after treatment.

  • N - Can you help me find lodging and services?

    The McLaren Hospitality House, located on the campus of the McLaren Proton Therapy Center, provides convenient, comfortable and low-cost lodging for patients and families, complete with kitchen and laundry facilities. Our patient support services team can provide information about the McLaren Hospitality House and the surrounding area.

  • O - Can you work with my medical oncologist? What relationship do you have with my other health providers?

    We work closely with your medical oncologist and other healthcare providers to coordinate your overall care. When your treatment is completed, you may return to your local physician for most follow-up care.

  • L - Do I have to change my diet?

    The need for altering your diet depends on the location of your cancer. Your cancer is specific to you. We examine your cancer and give you a recommendation.

  • F - Do I have to have a doctor’s referral?

    You do not have to have a doctor’s referral. Please contact us to see if proton therapy is right for you.

  • K - Do I have to quit my job?

    No. The side effects of our proton therapy treatments are minimal and should not keep you from working.

  • M - Do I need to relocate to Flint for treatment?

    If you are within 1 ½ -2 hours from the Proton Therapy Center, you could probably drive in each day, but some patients may choose to temporarily relocate to the area. The McLaren Hospitality House, located on the campus of the McLaren Proton Therapy Center, provides convenient, comfortable and low-cost lodging for patients and families, complete with kitchen and laundry facilities. Our patient support services team can provide information about the McLaren Hospitality House and the surrounding area.

  • G - Does insurance cover proton therapy?

    Medicare and most major insurance carriers in the U.S. cover proton therapy. The McLaren Proton Therapy staff can answer your questions and advocate on your behalf with your insurance company.